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My Pet Peeve.

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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sun Jul 06, 2008 8:21 pm

Well, the point to the argument is. The value of art as a whole. And what people in general will pay. I think if you went to art art show. And thier were sculptures and paintings there for 3,000.00 to 10,000.00 dollars. Also at the same art show thier are paintings and sculptures thier for 300.00 to 500.00. In the minds of the buyers that
ings down the value of the higher priced work. It would be like walking on a used car lot with some nice late model cars on it. And also they have an old pick up truck. (Like The kind I drive. LOL.) It would devalue the nice cars. If an art show or art gallery don,t set some guildlines. Then it.s just a fhea market. Some artist don,t think much of thier work. It,s like the old saying. I would,nt go to a party that would invite me as a guess. In the big picture, I don,t think thiers to much of that going on. But I can see how for some of us. It can be a real issue.
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Selling Prices

Postby nigelartist » Thu Jul 10, 2008 3:12 am

Hi.

The price we sell our works at seems to be the theme of the day. I have always sold my pieces for next to nothing or given them away.

NOT NOW!

We are talented people with creative gives given to use (by God?) to use to glorify our skills and
ing pleasure and thought provocation to others who may not always 'think like us'.

Maybe that's how the term 'starving artist' originated...through artist's NOT pricing their works correctly.

Then again...how does one evaluate one's work? Answers on a postcard...the million dollar question.


I like John's advice...big price and be aggressive.

Our skills cannot be bought off the shelf at the supermarket/shopping mall.

Think of a figure...double it!

Love nigelartist
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it's very relative

Postby vertigoclimb » Wed Aug 06, 2008 11:09 am

Though I totally agree that art is priceless... I must admit that I've sold mine many times for much less than it's "worth". I did this for very real and simple reasons.

I've been an artist for many years starting with murals. As I became more experienced it began to just pour out like a tap. I can't judge it or critique it myself but when people are looking at my work and their eyes light up and I see the love for it on their faces I feel paid. If someone loves my work and it gives them joy I feel paid. If they are poor or have little money I'd still much rather see them take it home and have it
ing them great joy than to sell it to some yahoo with a big wallet and a collection of unappreciated art collecting dust.

I have a friend who is very wealthy who showed me the inside of a large storage unit (that wasn't climate controlled) that was full of art. I started looking through it and found an original Picasso sketch laying there in a stack of other beautiful pieces. It will moulder and be gone in a few years and never seen again. I'm sure his family spent a small fortune to have it but it's out of favor with them so, it will continue to collect dust, bugs, bird nests, and mold.
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Postby arlynnhr » Wed Aug 06, 2008 3:23 pm

I think vertigoclimb has made a point there. It would be nice to make art accessible to the people who appreciate it and will emotionally give it the place it deserves. But artist have to make a living like any other professional.

My case is just like Spartan's...I have a full time job and don't spend so much time in front of my easel and I don't have an art degree, so it's hard to even guess what is the right price. Pehiatt has given a lot of advice and examples on that matter that are really helpfull

It's true we amateurs don't know how to price our art accordingly...I guess some of the ones that "give away" their art at such low prices need whatever they can get to pay the bills...it's possible or don't have an idea as how much a reasonable price would be... Some even sell low to get the pieces rolling and get people talking about them...I guess they're waiting to rise the prizes once people get to know them better.

I mean, it's tough...it's not black or white...it depends a lot on what every individual has in its head:needs, wants, goals, selling strategies, etc.
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Postby Menolly » Thu Aug 07, 2008 9:13 am

I think the big issue with artists undervaluing their art or selling it cheap is that so many people these days think that art is like any other business, where their success is based on outselling competitors, or simply selling work consistently. From this perspective, high prices scare off buyers. But the art world - from my admittedly inexperienced perspective - does not seem to run on that idea, not with original art, at least. Besides, when the economy is bad, who's left to buy art but the people who have the disposable income to buy the high-priced art in the first place?

Am I on the right track here, or just talking out my butt? (It's turning into one of those days.)
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sun Aug 10, 2008 2:39 pm

Well uh, the thing is. You know. I guess I might say Holy Macal da Andy.
Perfection is what drives an artist.
The inability to achieve perfection is what creates a work of art.
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Postby BAReam » Thu Aug 14, 2008 8:36 pm

Thought I'd comment along these lines. The one thing that torques me more than anything is to have someone ask the price of a piece, then in the same
eath have the gaul to argue that it's not worth what you want; usually based on some bull **** idea that you didn't spend 20 years working on a piece. As for me, I refuse to work for anybody for a couple bucks an hour. If that's what they want; I'll keep it forever.

Been seriously burned several times. Let's just say it didn't make me feel all "warm & fuzzy"

The only serious argument my more or less adopted
other and I ever had was due to his statement that " if you didn't have anything to do in the first place {non work commited/ required} you can't place much value on what you "choose" to do. We nearly came to blows on that one :evil:

He, at the time, just could not get his head around the concept that I created this, and by all standards is good... therefor I have the right to determine what it is worth to ME. If you disagree, that is your purrogative. I won't be reaching into your pocket; but at the least I'm owed enough respect not to have them stand and argue about somethings value.

Further; if they didn't want something, and think it had some value, the entire issue would be a mute point

End rant... all the best
Bruce
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Postby william » Mon Sep 01, 2008 8:54 pm

I think some of the issue with pricing too is we tend to underprice our work to get it out there. If the artist is an "unknown", then the work is not as valuable and a more popular name... I felt a little silly when I compared the price on some of my works in my gallery and then looked at others' works..... that's where I think we get stuck as artists, we are our own worst critics, and I'm sure that reflects in price. But after the initial silly feeling wore off I figured if someone wants it, they would buy it or make a reasonable offer.

As a giver of gifts, paintings always make nice gifts, but there's a point where you have to say, it's not for free. I have seen at least one image I would by from each of you if I could afford to do so. So with that said, price yourself at a comfort zone you feel is right. There are tons of oppinions on pricing, but you know what's fair for you and where you're being ripped off...

Oh and to add to the list of peeves....I work very hard both as an artist and an art instructor.. I've had colleagues and students who have wanted my paintings and drawings for free...as a favor. Some people I owe favors to, that's ok, but it's the few who you never really say more than hi to that get to me. Especially when you mention price.
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