A Singular Creation Art Community
promoting and showcasing all types of art and photography

Hi Fellow Artists

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Hi Fellow Artists

Postby dianapotts » Sun Jul 27, 2008 10:35 am

Hi. I was searching for online art communities and this one really caught my eye because of the quality of art displayed and the opportunities available including having a forum for support. I am very impressed. I like the name too as it implies really delving into the creation process for truly original work.

I lived in a house one time where I had roommates and a kitchen with a fireplace. I used to do my drawing on the kitchen table. Everybody was really nice and let me draw. When I was finished I would show it to my roommates and often they were pleased.

I enjoy being alone and live alone. But I am not reclusive and enjoy the company of human beings and showing my art as I do it. I've been looking for an art community where people are very creative and supportive of one another and where I can participate in a group.

I like to blog. I currently like to do graphite but have explored colored pencil extensively and some painting. In previous decades I have blockprinted on silk and cotton. I live in a rural area not too far from where the Woodstock Music Festival was held. My hobbies are bicycling and cooking. I have had a business for 34 years cleaning houses and enjoy it.

I have sold art on ebay and enjoyed doing that. I submitted a proposal for the World Trade Center Site memorial Competition in 2003.

I am good for turning to for moral support. I know how to listen and not judge. I care about people deeply.

Diana
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Postby Singular » Sun Jul 27, 2008 1:10 pm

Hello Diana,
Welcome to ASC. It is very nice to have you here. I look forward to seeing more of your art and I hope you enjoy your time with us.

all the best,
Joe
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Postby dianapotts » Sun Jul 27, 2008 1:24 pm

Thank you.
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Postby Erika Takacs » Sun Jul 27, 2008 1:29 pm

Hi Diana, welcome to ASC. I like your honest intro and your drawing. Hope you load up more. There's lots of good things going on this site for sure, regardless of how long you've been an artist.
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hello diana!

Postby Menolly » Mon Jul 28, 2008 10:10 pm

Welcome from another new member. Would you be able to help me with something? I have considered selling some of my own pieces on eBay, but I am not a professional or widely-recognized artist. I am concerned that I will not have a way to prove the authenticity of my art, or that buyers will not be interested in amateur work. Do you have any suggestions?
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Postby dianapotts » Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:40 am

Hi! Welcome menolly! I began selling on ebay in the early 2000's. I would suggest putting up a few pieces that aren't very expensive. I have used their basic format for their auctions and I make sales. If you do this consistently over time, people will see that and you can build a customer base that way and even some fans. I have never used a certificate of authenticity. I think maybe it is a document that has your embossed stamp on it. I am not sure how to get that done, but I have a hunch that it is a process that would start with a notarized document. Perhaps in your town you can find where there is a notary public and they may be able to tell you the process. A notarized document can be made to prove that it is you about to do something like produce your own legal document. Then you would apply for the stamper and then you make the documents. When you have that whole process done you can say on your eBay auction that you are certified and then send it off worth the work when a sale is made. I am not a lawyer, but you may want to talk with your attorney about this. It may include registering with your state as a business which I recommend anyway for tax purposes.

Regarding pricing on ebay, don't sell yourself short. If your work is good, it will sell. Ebay is full of a lot of themes and such. Don't get into the trap of that if you see a subject on ebay then you do it. Instead be as original as you are. I am like that and my work sells. You may have to list it more than once. Just be yourself.

On eBay there are groups. One group is called ACEO or art cards and originals. I belong to that. They are cards the size of baseball collector cards. Artist make art that size. People collect them and they are quite a hit on ebay. I used to do well making them. They don't take long to make and you can have collectors. They are good for collecting because people can buy notebooks that fit them in. If you make one just put ACEO in the title of the auction and people who search for them won't have to go through the 20,000+ artist auctions to find yours. I highly recommend this as a starting point. It's also a good way to build a reputation without making large works that you have to start with lower prices.

Art on eBay, at least for those starting out, is priced and sells much lower than gallery. I would suggest pricing by thinking of what you would want to get from a gallery for a piece and taking that price and dividing it in half. At an offline art group meeting once, when a question came up as to how to price for auctions in general, this is what was suggested. For galleries and professional buyers online that are looking, that know this formula, especially if you state in your auction that you have sold in galleries, it would be a good indicator to them as far as value. It seems to be an industry formula.

Don't be intimidated at first by the lower prices on ebay.

Another thing I have noticed on ebay is that artists who sell more expensive works and have higher prices, usually start out low and the bids go up. However it takes time to build this kind of reputation. Start with smaller works. The ones who sell large paintings for triple digits consistently have been doing it for awhile.

I have only sold one painting on eBay. I have only posted one painting on eBay. It was a small acrylic abstract piece for twenty five dollars. I suggest making small gems of paintings and build up. I do more pencil works.

The most important thing is to make art from your heart that has high quality. Start small and low. You can build a business on eBay. It's the one area on eBay that if done right, will not be a flea market type place. But the key is imagination, quality and consistency. And also don't get in a rut of style. Change or you will get copiers and you will stop getting buyers. In art innovation of your own style is what counts.

Good luck,

Diana
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Postby Erika Takacs » Tue Jul 29, 2008 11:50 am

I agree with much Diana says. But it takes a long time to develop a following. I've seen many good quality works sacrified for pennies in order to build up your ratings as a seller. And no matter whether you sell or not, you pay your fee to eBay, which keeps rising. Some accomplished artists use eBay as a great tool as I noticed. Forest Rogers, a fantasy doll sculptor uses it with much success, but only occasionally. Her pieces sell for over $1000 with multiple bids. I'd say observe for a while, before you jump in. See if it's worthed or not.
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Thanks for the eBay advice

Postby Menolly » Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:53 pm

Thanks guys; I appreciate the help.
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Postby dianapotts » Wed Jul 30, 2008 8:32 am

Erica is right. If the survival base in your life is stable right now and you want to try, just make some smaller pieces of high quality work ad keep at it. If you post only a few pieces at a time and not a whole lot, the eBay fees aren't that expensive I have found. They have changed it so that most of the cost is after it sells. Price your work to include that. The mistake many people make is to list so many pieces that they have to have higher prices and then everything is sucked up into fees. When much of it doesn't sell, it messes them up and they owe eBay money. Get a piece of paper and play with the numbers so you don't get caught in this trap. Make a comfort zone of numbers for yourself. Don't forget you are getting exposure also. Let us know how it goes.

Diana
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Postby arlynnhr » Wed Jul 30, 2008 9:14 am

It might be a good idea to sell prints instead of the original work... It's just that I remember something Dawn said that if you sell the original you have to price it accordingly because you won't see it again or gain any more money from it. So, I guess it would be good to start by selling cheaper prints. What do you think?
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