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Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

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Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby RichardDevine » Fri Apr 22, 2016 9:40 am

Work in Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park
A few years ago, for our 25th anniversary, my wife and I took a trip to the northwest US and Canada – Washington state and British Columbia. The scenery is phenomenal – towering mountains, huge stands of Douglas Fir, mist enshrouded lakes of azure, thunderous waves breaking on rocky shores. We traveled throughout the region and took more than a thousand photos. There were beautiful landscapes everywhere we looked.
Ruby Beach was one spot we visited. It’s located on the southwest coast of the Olympic Peninsula, and is one of the most well known and visited beaches along the Pacific coast. It gets its name from the reddish sand that sometimes gathers on the beach. The beach catches a large amount of driftwood, which only adds to the picturesque nature of the area. The iconic sea stacks that dot the shoreline make this beach perfect for a painting. The morning we visited the beach mist was still hanging just above the waves rolling in off the Pacific. For us, and the other people who walked the shoreline that morning, it was a picture out of a wonderful fantasy.
While looking through the images from that day I came across a number of them that I felt would make a wonderful painting. I cropped a few of them in a variety of ways to get different views. On closer notice I found one that caught a group of people walking the beach, backlit by sunlit mist, and I zoomed in on that group a bit. They would provide a great focal point for the painting.
I haven’t made any final decisions on the layout – or the medium - yet. I’ll discuss more of that in my next update. Included here are a few potential compositions.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby Singular » Mon Apr 25, 2016 9:04 pm

Looking forward to seeing this Rich.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby RichardDevine » Mon May 02, 2016 10:31 am

A Discussion on Detail
Normally, I would be launching into Update 2 of my latest painting here but I wanted, instead to discuss an important crossroads I've come to in my art, a personal enlightenment or awareness of sorts that has been developing for some time. It affects directly the piece I’m currently working on, as well as all the pieces I’ve created in the past and hopefully all the ones I will create in the future.

When I plan out my paintings I do my best to incorporate the principles of good composition. I usually go through my books and notes and refresh myself before each painting. I feel the more I go over those principles the more it’ll become part of my subconscious thought. I take my craft seriously and do the best I can to produce the best painting I’m capable of. I also have a tendency to put a lot of detail in my paintings – it’s just a natural predisposition on my part. I put detail everywhere. I’ve been under the impression that good composition includes lots of detail. I’ve always taken it for granted and never questioned the thought that the more detail I included in my paintings (along with following all the other composition principles) the better my paintings would be. And yet, when I finished a painting, there was something about it that made it appear to me less than professional. It was good – but there was something missing. I didn’t quite know what that something was.
I surely tried my best to incorporate all the principles of good composition. What was I doing wrong? Not enough detail or realism? I also knew that when I saw meticulously drawn portraits, ones that looked like photos, I was impressed by the technical skill, but unimpressed by the artistic nature of the drawing. As far as I was concerned, the drawing was leaving the realm of art and entering the realm of photography. I preferred paintings and drawings that looked as if they had been painted and drawn. If a drawing was completed to that extent, why not just photograph the subject. So, it wasn’t more detail that was the answer.
Of late, however, emerging from the deep recesses of my mind is the thought that I have been putting too much detail in my paintings and, instead of making the painting better, I am actually doing the opposite. Many of you out there may already know that detail must be judiciously used, but it’s a revelation to me! I wonder if the amount of detail I include is cancelling out or masking some of the other design principles I’ve worked so hard to include. My paintings are too technical, emotionally lacking. In his article The Power of Suggestion, written for Artists Network, Richard McKinley, a noted pastelist, in talking about “painting the essence”, recounted an early experience in his career when he was completing a portrait: “After spending meticulous hours placing every strand of hair on a head, the instructor pointed out to me that I couldn’t really see all of those hairs, especially from root to tip. Instead, I was putting in what I knew about hair, instead of what I was capable of seeing. By showing me that the texture of hair was more evident where there was contrast, facilitated by the presence of intense light, I was able to let go of what I knew to be true about hair and paint what I was capable of seeing, which was the “essence” of hair.”
But, how much detail is OK and when does detail begin to work against the painting? Too much detail can make the painting confusing and busy. It makes the eyes stop everywhere on the painting, rather than where I want the viewers eyes to concentrate. It draws attention away from the point of interest. You can get detail overload.
I’m attracted to detail in paintings, but at the same time I admire looser, more painterly paintings, paintings that rely more on the emphasis of shapes, value and color relationships, contrast and lighting, with minimal detail. They seem to elicit more of an emotional response in me, rather than an admiration of technical skill for copying detail. I prefer the emotional response. A landscape artist whose paintings I’ve come to be very impressed with is Peder Mork Monsted, a Danish landscape painter who lived and painted in the late 19th and early 20th century. When I first came across images of his landscape paintings I was emotionally drawn to them – they seemed so poetic - and, at the same time, I loved the level of detail in them. However, thanks to an article by James Gurney about detail in paintings, when I looked more closely at them – when I looked at that detail – I was surprised to see that the detail was an illusion. Monsted was so skillful at painting that he could produce a convincing suggestion of realism. Wow!
I’ve mentioned before that paintings are meant to be viewed from a distance. No one gets up close and personal unless they want to see detail. Detail can’t be seen from a distance. Why produce detail that has to be looked close up, when you will be looking at the painting from a distance and all you need is the suggestion of detail. If you can give the impression of detail that looks good from a distance, there’s no need to put in real detail. At least, that’s the way I’m beginning to think. The illusion of detail, such as was done so expertly by Monsted, seems the best route. James Gurney was spot on when he wrote about Monsted’s handling of plants “One can be faithful to the character of the plants without copying or imitating every detail. Instead, nature must be re-created or represented in paint on the canvas.”
Other compositional elements of a painting are more important than merely being skillful at copying details. Details are OK to include in a painting but they must add to a good basic underlying structure, rather than be the focus of the painting. While I’ve been attentive to other aspects of composition to draw the viewer’s eyes to the center of interest, such as the rule of thirds, sweet spots, contrast, value and flow, I’ve completely forgotten about the importance of detail, and how it fits into a good painting. I really don’t want to create a painting merely to impress others about my skill at painting detail. I don’t want to create a picture. I want to create a painting. But where do I draw the line? How much detail is too much detail?
In an interesting article in the July/August 2015 issue of Artist Magazine entitled “Painting without Painting”, Jimmy Wright, a notable pastelist, interviewed Duane Wakeham, a famous landscape pastelist in his own right, on the subject of detail in landscape paintings. Wakeham recounted an en plein air outing between two painters in 1930’s Santa Fe. “At the end of the session”, Wakeham goes on, “ Gustave Baumann turned to the other, Louie Ewing, and commented that Ewing’s painting had too many details. ’Louie’, he said, ‘yours is a picture. Mine is a painting.’” Wakeham was impressed by the story and said that he wanted to create paintings, not pictures. Me, too.

Detail should be confined to the areas where the focus is intended and less so in the rest of the painting. Elsewhere, suggest detail, don’t do detail. A painting should be composed in such a manner that there is a tight focus and more detail on the center of interest and less emphasis on the periphery. This is, supposedly, the way our eyes perceive the world. We focus in on things of interest and all that surrounds it is less detailed. However, we do look over a scene often and, although we focus on a single object in one instant, we look elsewhere and focus in on something else. It still remains that, in a painting, there is a center of interest. Something we want the viewer to see, and that is where we place emphasis.

This is an important point in my love affair with art. With your indulgence I hope to continue this discussion in the next installment before pressing on with the painting. Articulating these thoughts in writing is very helpful for it allows me to develop a plan of action to create better art. Possibly, some of this of this will be helpful to you as well.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby RichardDevine » Fri May 06, 2016 8:37 am

Since the present discussion of detail and edges rightfully belongs to a blog post, and not here on a painting update, I decided to place it on my Journal on my website. Seems I can't add photos to my blog here on ASC. Check out he second half of this discussion there. Next week I'll start posting Updates to Ruby Beach again.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby CarlOwen » Sat May 07, 2016 9:06 am

Well Richard, you just wrote the thesis on how I approach my painting. I constantly strive to produce a painting, not just a picture. By using the word "just" displays my attitude about the superiority of a painting. I am going to post a few in my gallery so you can see what I am talking about. As I have said before many times, I am better than most, equal to some and less than a few in my painting skills. I am ok with that. If I can produce just one masterpiece in the style I am seeking I will die a happy man.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby RichardDevine » Sat May 07, 2016 9:38 am

Amen to that!

However, Carl, I've been doing some more digging. More things bothering me. Is a focal point necessary? I am not totally convinced it is in every instance. And there are a lot of artists who believe it ISN'T ALWAYS necessary. Sometimes the artist wants the viewer to look over the entire painting, with no particular subject. Maybe it's the whole scene that the artist wants the viewer to explore. There is an argument for that also. Sometimes you have a subject of interest and sometimes not. This is fodder for another discussion. I've just begun to explore that aspect. That being said, I still had in mind that the egrets in Withlacoochee Flight were the main focus and I should have done more to point to them - like lessening some of the detail and softening some edges more. I did some of that subconsciously but I should have thought more about it and made a conscious effort to point to the egrets. I will be exploring those aspects of composition more in the future and will post discussions. Thanks for your input and I'd welcome more of your thoughts - and everyone else, too, on the subject of edges, detail and focal points.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby CarlOwen » Mon May 09, 2016 10:05 am

Good morning Richard. It has taken me some time to mull over your last comments. I didn't want to be flippant or shallow with my responses. So, here goes. I don't care about focal points in a painting. To me, it requires to much control. When I have to much control over the painting, it gets killed. The painting can look like a beautiful copy of a photograph lacking the vibrancy of a painting. It simply becomes a beautiful corpse.

The focal point in a portrait is already there. It is the subject. Same thing is true with a still life. Landscapes are a little different. The whole painting is actually the focal point when framed as it is a representative of a location that has some visual interest and importance.

However, I strive to paint three to five points of interest in the painting. Less than three is not sufficient to hold the viewer's attention. And, the longer you can hold the viewer's attention, the more life the viewer imparts onto the painting. More than five and the viewer becomes confused.

In portraits, the main point of interest is always the eyes, just like in real life. A second point of interest is usually the hair or a part on the hair to bring a visual shift in the viewer to look from the eyes to the hair. The third point would be that special facial characteristic unique to that person like a quirk in the smile, the shape of the nose, the form of the ear, etc. When I succeed with enhancing these points of interest by sharp contrasts of color, shading, lines or implied lines the painting captures the character of the subject more so than the accurate rendition of the subject. I always try to keep it as loose as possible to let the paint do the work of presentation. To me, causing the viewer to have eye movement on the painting actually brings the painting "alive" to the viewer. The life is of course imparted by the viewer engaged in eye movement upon the painting.

The kind of responses I get from viewers who see the real thing in person makes me believe I am on the right track. The comments like, "Wow that looks just like him", or, "she looks like she is going to say something", when in reality it looks nothing like the photograph lets me know I have caused the viewer to see and relate to the character of the person. The background is important with the aspect of shading various colors basic to the persons, for lack of a better way of saying it, aurora. The implication of light source(s) manipulated in the background contributes to the illusion of three dimensionality of the subject, so the shading of the subject properly combined and juxtaposed with the light assists with the brain's interpretation of the three dimensionality illusion upon that two dimensional plane of the canvas.

Pallet knife painting of landscapes is thrilling when I let the paint depth and stoke of the knife define the forms. I think I will stop here for now because the structure of making it "happen" is so much different for me than the techniques used with portraits. I have to shift gears after I think a bit.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby jenn_iam » Wed May 11, 2016 12:50 pm

I look forward to seeing this come to life Richard, I have no doubts it will be amazing. :)
May your world be painted in the Brightest of colors!

Jennifer Erin
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(All mediums; Conceptual Design, Costume Creation, to Application)
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby RichardDevine » Thu May 12, 2016 8:10 am

You make some good points, Carl. But I see that you still plan in focus points, so you still are putting in the effort to include pointers guiding viewers to where you want them to look. You're afraid of losing the spontaneity by doing too much planning. I think if the painting is planned out in the initial stages with tone and color studies and line drawings to build the composition, you can still be spontaneous when painting.

This thought of the necessity for a subject or focus point in a landscape is a debatable point. As you say the whole painting can be the focus point. In Peder Monsted's landscape paintings, I find it difficult to find a focus, so I'm not sure if he has included one. And his paintings work.
after doing some research I find that artists seem to be divided on this point. You are in good stead with many who don't believe in focus points in landscape paintings. I think I have come to the conclusion that they are not necessary but can be included. In the initial conception of the painting, the artist must decide if the painting is about a single subject, a few subjects of interest or none in particular. If it is just a scene and the artist wishes the viewer to explore the whole painting without guides, then the artist includes nothing to guide the eyes in a certain path. If it is a landscape with something of particular interest, the artist makes use of compositional cues to direct his viewers eyes to that particular spot. The painting can also have a center of interest and also points of lesser but still interesting points of interest. In that case, there can be stronger cues for the center of interest and weaker cues for the spots of lesser importance. These choices give the artist a lot of latitude and freedom, but still choices must be made in the beginning.

To avoid a painting from becoming too busy or confusing, many artists agree that the treatment of edges is very important. I never really thought about that seriously before but it makes a lot of sense. A lot of detail shows a great deal of technical skill and talent and I thought that my paintings would improve by increasing the amount of detail, but I'm not so sure any more. The paintings can get to look too mechanical. Detail can be increased to the point where the painting looks like a photograph. That's not necessarily a good thing. Some artists feel insulted by that comparison, others not. I don't want people to mistake my paintings for photographs. My thoughts are evolving in that area. Here's where the handling of edges comes in. The most important area(s) of the painting receive the sharpest edges (among other cues), while areas of lesser importance receive softer or lost edges, so the eyes don't settle there. You are right when you talk about portraits with strong cues directed to the eyes and the use of light and shading elsewhere.

In the end, the artist has to think about what he or she wants the viewer to think or feel when in front of the painting. For me it is beginning to be more of "feel emotionally". I think I have always wanted that but I somehow I got sidetracked with detail. I am a detail, technical oriented artist, but somehow I have to be more discriminating in some of my paintings. I have to think before I start what my goal is and have to keep that in mind as I progress. Sometimes a lot of detail is good, sometimes not. It depends on my goal. Whether I will be able to make the transition to more discriminatory detail and a more painterly style remains to be seen. My thoughts are still evolving.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby CarlOwen » Thu May 12, 2016 3:04 pm

Richard. It is such a pleasure to discuss art with you. I appreciate that you consider me an artist worthy of your time to explore concepts, ideas, and the simple esoteric involvement with the activity to produce a work of art. It appears we approach the same subject from polar opposite positions. I read in your comments your approach with starting from a position of planning and detail. I start from the position of rough thought and some vague idea of a plan to finishing with detail. I call this the "dialog". I start with sometimes drawing lines on the canvas, sometimes just slapping the paint on the canvas. A blank canvas begs for attention while daring it to be violated by your attempts to capture and change its purity. I draw, splash around, erase, think, do it again until the canvas gets tired of being messed with and starts telling me what It wants to do. At that point, time no longer exists. I let the canvas talk to me. Of course, technically, that is the point when the right brain starts taking over with the formation of ideas, color organization, line structure, and special placements of forms, shadows, fades, lines, definition, and fogs.

So, given this approach, I do not plan where I place focal points. I do not plan where the details shall be. I let the painting "talk to me". A slip of the brush, a glob of unplanned paint, a sudden contrast between a dark and light space that catches my attention redirects ...... Argue!! Life interruptions. House cleaner just arrived. Wife wants to plant primroses. Does not matter I am busy, they both want my attention and directions. My fault. I forgot my time for this is with my morning coffee when the world has not awakened yet. Got to go now. See you in the morning.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby CarlOwen » Fri May 13, 2016 9:04 am

Good morning Richard. Got my coffee and my time. So, to continue. That little element that catches my attention while I am painting helps me see what should come next. Some times it completely changes the concept or the direction I was taking with the painting. I always have some idea of where I am going with a painting, but I most often allow the painting choose the path. It is those little missteps, those little happenstances, the serendipity of construction that seems to breath life into the painting. I hate it when I produce a technically correct painting that is D.O.A. So, I on purpose allow the painting to "talk" to me.

I don't think I create focal points, at least not in the traditional manner as I capture points of interest by allowing the serendipity of the painting to proceed to the finish. Each painting is a learning experience that helps me further develop my craft. It is good to read your comments about how you are changing and developing in your manner. I am far from the finish line, hopefully. I look forward to seeing this one finished. Have you thought about using a pallet knife?
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby RichardDevine » Sun May 15, 2016 8:41 am

Work in Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park, Update 2
Progress is slow on this project. It’s not because I’m having problems with it, though. It’s because spring is here, and the plants (and weeds) in my garden are beginning to grow. That means my painting projects will have to share time with my garden work (and, of course, home projects). I love my garden, and I love horticulture. I did it for a living for thirty some years. My wife and I have invested a lot of time and money creating the gardens. We have a great number of shrubs and perennials that need tending to. Trimming, edging, weeding, planting, fertilizing, watering. In addition, I’m still converting an attached room on the back of the house to a studio. That’s coming along nicely and I’m excited about it.
So, as you can see, my time will be divided up among a number of tasks. And, I didn’t mention, I’m doing a graphite drawing on the side that needs to be completed in less than a week. That’s coming along nicely, also.

As always, my first step in the process of creating a painting is developing a composition. I try to plan out my paintings so I don’t have to contend with surprises. That’s not to say that I don’t like some spontaneity in my work – I do, – but the basic plan for me has to be laid out. Once I get into the painting, I can make changes. But, I have to have a somewhat clear path to the goal. I don’t like to leave too much to chance.
The photos I presented during the last session were closeups of another, farther view. I noticed on that original photo a grouping of people walking on the beach, backlit by early morning mist, and felt that group of people would make an interesting focal point for the landscape scene. The eyes are drawn to people, even though they are small and unidentifiable.
From that photo I worked up some thumbnail sketches in gradations of gray to get a feel for the arrangement of tone and masses. The first sketch was pretty much a copy of the cropped photo. I liked the idea of the darker masses surrounding the lighter area of people. The dark mass of the rock in the lower left seemed out of place and was distracting, so I removed it. That helped but the composition seemed unbalanced. All of the masses are on one side. In the next sketch I increased the size of the rock mass on the right. That seemed to help but it still seemed a bit unbalanced, with the weight of dark masses still on the left. And, the masses were all too similar in size. It made the composition a little static. Another problem was that the focus area was more in the middle of the picture. That wasn’t good. I had to move that focus area.
My third composition was better. I moved everything down some and a little to the left. That helped. I also increased the size of the rock mass on the right much more to better balance the dark masses on the left. It felt better. One reason I moved the masses down was to better divide the horizontal plane into thirds. Another reason was to get more of the sky in. The cloud formation was interesting and I wanted to keep as much of it as I could.
The fourth composition is similar to the third but is shifted even more, placing the group of people close to the intersection of lines dividing the picture into thirds. To further point in the direction of the people on the beach I emphasized the dark line of the hill side on the left so as to point to the people. I did the same on the right by making the sloping side of the rock formation curve down and toward the people.
Another change I made in this fourth composition was to explore the idea of a beach at the bottom, rather than rolling waves. This way I could make the waves curve in the direction of the people. I was originally drawn to the action of the waves rolling in off the sea, so I’m not sure I want to eliminate that.
The fifth composition was a vertical format. This keeps the beach goers down on the lower left but gives me more sky. I’ve kept the beach in the lower left corner. This is an interesting view also and worth exploring.

I’ve come up with five compositions and made some improvements along the way. I’ll be looking at these and thinking about other possibilities. There may be other arrangements that look good. No reason to rush at this point. I’ll have to make a decision on whether to keep the beach in or not, how much of the sky to show, and the format, vertical or horizontal.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby CarlOwen » Sun May 15, 2016 6:37 pm

Well Richard, I am always fascinated to see your work in progress and am educated by you commentary. I find that we artists prefer the visual power of a vertical painting. I have learned through research, the buying public, not so much. Of course I intend to check in on this from time to time. Am I detecting a slight change in your shading technique?
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby RichardDevine » Mon May 23, 2016 10:03 am

Work in Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park, Update 3
I came up with 3 more possible compositions – for a total of 8 for this painting. There may be more possibilities but I’m satisfied with these 8.
Composition 6, a horizontal format, keeps the group of people at the lower left but adds a dark mass to the lower left corner. I thought it might help to frame the people on the beach, adding to the darks to the left and top of them. However, it adds to much dark to one side, I think, and is out of balance. It would necessitate another dark mass on the right and I think that would be too much dark mass. It would also decrease the amount of light mass at the bottom, which is balancing the light tone of the sky.
I went back to a vertical format for Compositions 7 and 8. In Composition 7 I stuck wit more wave action, a breaking wave on the lower right and a slightly lower rock mass on the right. I like this composition but wondered if the breaking wave competed with the group of people. Maybe not.
In Composition 8 I decreased the wave action by bringing the beach closer to the last of the waves rolling up onto the beach. The lower part is residual water, fairly still and reflecting the sky, the rocks and the tree masses. I also raised the height of the rock mass on the right, which seems to have emphasized the vertical feeling of the painting.
So, which one of these compositions seems the best? Which one am I drawn to? The 3 I like the most are numbers 3, 4, 7 and 8, two horizontal and 2 vertical formats. I have to say I like the horizontal formats more. The vertical formats, I think, emphasize the people because the group of people take up nearly a third of the width of the picture. The sky and clouds also play a bigger part. The horizontal formats emphasize the scenery, the expanse of the beach, the tree masses and rock. I’m drawn more to the scene. The people are seen nearly first in the vertical format while the scenery is seen first in the horizontal format. However the construction of the rock masses pointing to the people on the beach, as well as the white mist behind them draws the eye to them. “Oh, what a beautiful scene. Hey, look, there’s some people on the beach!” That’s what I hope I’m creating here. I’m leaning toward Compositions 3 and 4.
In Composition 3 the rock mass on the right is larger than in Composition 8. There is more wave action also. There is much wet sand in Composition 4, especially on the left side. The thin layer of water reflects the sky and rock masses and, I think, creating some balance. I like the slightly lower rock mass in Composition 4. The lines of the waves rolling in as well as the edge of the surf points toward the beach combers, helping to draw the eye in that direction.
My composition choice is either 3 or 4 and I’ll have to do some more ruminating. I’ll make that choice this week and then start on the color studies. Meanwhile I’m finishing up a graphite drawing for exhibit and post that next week as well.
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Re: Work In Progress: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park

Postby RichardDevine » Wed Jun 01, 2016 1:20 pm

Gallery Representation – a great opportunity requires some changes.
I’ve had to make some unexpected changes with regard to my art projects and the changes require that I postpone the Ruby Beach project. I recently made arrangements to display many of my paintings at a local gallery – a great arrangement – but continuing to display my work there means I will have to do more paintings depicting regional scenes or paintings with more general appeal, such a botanical or floral.
The gallery which will be displaying my work is Florida Artists Gallery, located at 8219 Orange Avenue, Floral City, just a block west of the traffic light in this small but quaint, historic city on the west coast of Florida in Citrus County. Floral City is but a stones throw from the big metropolises of Tampa and Orlando, and attracts many art lovers from those cities. The gallery houses the works of many very talented local artists who work in oils, watercolor, pastel, graphite and acrylic and is well worth a visit. There is even a café in the building, allowing you to dine at the same time. You can find more information about the gallery at flartistsgallery.com.
There are a great many areas of Florida, both natural and historic, that provide innumerable ideas for great paintings – the marshes of the northwest coast and St John’s River in the east, the Withlacoochee River (from which I received inspiration for Withlacoochee Flight”, the lakes and rivers of the central region, the beaches of the east and west coasts and the great expanses of the Everglades on the southern tip of the state. I’ll be looking at many of these areas for more inspiration.
So, I’ll be suspending the work on Ruby Beach (I’ll return to this painting in the future) but check back in the next few days for an update on a new painting – a floral.
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Joined: Thu Feb 20, 2014 9:08 am
Location: Dunnellon, FL
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Blog: View Blog (26)


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