A Singular Creation Art Community
promoting and showcasing all types of art and photography

Socio-political commentary

If you want to discuss anything art related this is the place to be.

Moderator: Moderators

Socio-political commentary

Postby BAReam » Tue Aug 12, 2008 8:48 am

I was wondering why I don't really see much here relating to socio-political issues. I'm sure as artists these issues are considered important and worthy of exploring. There certainly are enough topics to address :o

all the best... Bruce
User avatar
BAReam
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Iowa--USA

There is a price to pay

Postby pehiatt » Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:54 am

I believe that most of us here are very aware of many social-political issues that are dear to each of our hearts. There are however also problems with expressing our minds and feelings.

30 years ago I was always able to express myself on almost everything. I could openly express my beliefs even in the army. That has all changed.

During the 60's and 70's I owned a poster shop and illustrated for many social-political newspapers. My stands on civil rights, race relations and the Vietnam war labeled me as a radical liberal and there was a price to pay. My studio was raided several times by helmeted police and I had posters banned from sale in book stores etc. This also affected my employability in the commercial art world even hough I never took on the persona of a hippy.. Thats why I left and sought seclusion in an Ozark cabin for 8 years.

When I came back down from th nor is the placee mountain in 78 we were in an ultra conservative world. The free love, free thinking children of Aquarius had shed their tie died clothes and put on white shirts with ties; joining the corporate world of greed, corruption and exploitation. I went to work for the government and I had to tone down my objections to social injustice. Then came the Bush years where your political point of view linked directly to employment. For the first four years of his administration everyone even slightly to the left had to keep their mouth shut.

While I became a token liberal at work and now within a very conservative community I still have to watch what I say. People don't want to be reminded about difficult issues. There is little middle ground today. Free thinking is just not allowed. I have been asked to submit work for a homeless themed show in August and one on the political state of Washington in September. Maybe I will maybe I won't.

When I step out and raise my hand I quickly draw lightning. Many Web sites are closed to politically incorrect and unpopular points of view. Even family and friends are only willing to go so far to support you and any forum that exhibits social-political art becomes a forum for controversy. Even this web site can only handle so much.

My hope is that as I regain artistic standing I will also be able to raise my voice again. Now is not the time nor is this the place.
User avatar
pehiatt
 
Posts: 395
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2007 8:22 pm
Location: Frederick Maryland
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby Menolly » Tue Aug 12, 2008 12:20 pm

I think pehiatt hit the nail on the head, in terms of the current attitude toward political and social issues. However, this forum strikes me as a fairly open-minded place, where it should be safe to display our true thoughts and feelings. (I will leave it to the more experienced members of this site to correct me if I am mistaken here.) I think the very fact that such fear exists in this country today should be the subject of a great deal of commentary in itself. Granted, I would never suggest that someone risk their work, their friendships, or dare I say their safety, but when even the young and foolish (I am referring to no one in particular here, except perhaps myself) are afraid to speak their minds about anything that could upset the status quo, then I would say that this country is very nearly screaming for a little reckless courage. I would think that the art world should hold at least one such person, and yet none have surfaced.

Forgive my rant. When I lack a picture for my thoughts, I tend to use the thousand words instead.
Menolly
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 3:32 pm
Gallery: View Gallery

Excentric

Postby pehiatt » Tue Aug 12, 2008 12:45 pm

The art world has had many eccentrics (outside the main stream). Picasso was a communist and Dali was a fascist. Mapplethorpe was... you get the point.

Most galleries are main stream. I know some that are not but they are not doing very well. News papers, television and most other media are guarding their bottom lines. Museums are locking controversial work away in the dark corners of their vaults. Art Books are being reprinted to remove "questionable" matter. Writers are not getting published. All of this is being done to appease an intolerant and often ignorant public ready to jump on anyone not following the social-political correct line.

There are no well known outspoken artist in the market right now. Everyone I know is holding back. We talk in private but are not ready to go public. The price is to high. Fighting government is one thing but going against the mob is another.
User avatar
pehiatt
 
Posts: 395
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2007 8:22 pm
Location: Frederick Maryland
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby Menolly » Tue Aug 12, 2008 1:23 pm

Pehiatt: Well, then I suppose that leaves the Internet. I know it doesn't exactly lead to wealth or recognition, yet, but is that possibly an avenue to explore?
Menolly
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 3:32 pm
Gallery: View Gallery

The internet

Postby pehiatt » Tue Aug 12, 2008 1:51 pm

The internet is still the most open and progressive means of expression but you still have to be careful. Post the wrong thing in the wrong place and you will get slapped. PC police are combing the net looking for any impropriety.

I must remember that this forum is for emerging artist to display their work and get feedback. We are not here to alienate anyone. To be political is to learn the art of compromise something many of us are not always willing to do.

For me I must always be kind. I will speak only when there is a proper opportunity. Most of all I will defend the right of free speech by those who don't agree with me. If I take a political slant in my art it will be subtitle and coated with so much sugar that anyone can swallow it. I love irony which often goes over most peoples head.

Art is always political, it can't be avoided. Social responsibility however requires that artist speak in a way that maintains at least some civility.

Part of free speech is learning to listen to others and look at the images others create. Everyone has something of value to say.
User avatar
pehiatt
 
Posts: 395
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2007 8:22 pm
Location: Frederick Maryland
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby Menolly » Tue Aug 12, 2008 3:01 pm

I can certainly understand the careful balance between making a point and upsetting people, but as you pointed out, everything gets blown out of proportion so easily today that it's almost impossible to even mention some subjects without risking a controversy. I'm not sure if its fear or social conditioning, or some combination of both, but I think it's time to try a little political tightrope-walking, because controversy seems to be the only thing that gets people to think these days.
Menolly
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 3:32 pm
Gallery: View Gallery

Re: Excentric

Postby Erika Takacs » Tue Aug 12, 2008 3:04 pm

pehiatt wrote:There are no well known outspoken artist in the market right now. Everyone I know is holding back. We talk in private but are not ready to go public. The price is to high. Fighting government is one thing but going against the mob is another.


How about Banksy? No wonder he prefers to stay anonymous. True, it drives up the price tag, if you're that mysterious, but I don't think that's the main reason behind his hiding.

Here's a blog entry about Banksy I wrote a while ago. His website is worth to be checket out.

http://erikatakacs.wordpress.com/2008/0 ... artists-2/
Erika Takacs
 
Posts: 2998
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 4:23 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada

Re: There is a price to pay

Postby BAReam » Tue Aug 12, 2008 4:50 pm

pehiatt wrote:I believe that most of us here are very aware of many social-political issues that are dear to each of our hearts. There are however also problems with expressing our minds and feelings.

30 years ago I was always able to express myself on almost everything. I could openly express my beliefs even in the army. That has all changed.

During the 60's and 70's I owned a poster shop and illustrated for many social-political newspapers. My stands on civil rights, race relations and the Vietnam war labeled me as a radical liberal and there was a price to pay. My studio was raided several times by helmeted police and I had posters banned from sale in book stores etc. This also affected my employability in the commercial art world even hough I never took on the persona of a hippy.. Thats why I left and sought seclusion in an Ozark cabin for 8 years.


When I came back down from th nor is the placee mountain in 78 we were in an ultra conservative world. The free love, free thinking children of Aquarius had shed their tie died clothes and put on white shirts with ties; joining the corporate world of greed, corruption and exploitation. I went to work for the government and I had to tone down my objections to social injustice. Then came the Bush years where your political point of view linked directly to employment. For the first four years of his administration everyone even slightly to the left had to keep their mouth shut.

While I became a token liberal at work and now within a very conservative community I still have to watch what I say. People don't want to be reminded about difficult issues. There is little middle ground today. Free thinking is just not allowed. I have been asked to submit work for a homeless themed show in August and one on the political state of Washington in September. Maybe I will maybe I won't.

When I step out and raise my hand I quickly draw lightning. Many Web sites are closed to politically incorrect and unpopular points of view. Even family and friends are only willing to go so far to support you and any forum that exhibits social-political art becomes a forum for controversy. Even this web site can only handle so much.

My hope is that as I regain artistic standing I will also be able to raise my voice again. Now is not the time nor is this the place.

Pehiatt... thank you for responding to my query.. I too have had the opportunity to experience the wrath for stating what I believe. But the truth is I'm a bit long in the tooth to remain silent forever.

And I'm not advocating any real radicalism... for the most part radicalism
eeds resistance and hostility. Also I'm a spokesman for neither the radical left; or radical right.

Part of the persona of the "Pawn" in my work is a description of being without an effective voice against what we might describe as the social/political status quo. Same old; same old :( !!

I just think It is part of an artist's social responsibility to comment, at least from time to time. Thanks again for your input... I respect your input, as I do any, and all productive views... be well!

all the best... Bruce
User avatar
BAReam
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Iowa--USA

Postby Menolly » Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:14 pm

BAReam: Don't sell the pawn short. It may be the humblest of the chess pieces, but it is the only one that can resurrect the fallen pieces. That's pretty effective!
Menolly
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 3:32 pm
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby BAReam » Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:17 pm

Menolly wrote:I can certainly understand the careful balance between making a point and upsetting people, but as you pointed out, everything gets blown out of proportion so easily today that it's almost impossible to even mention some subjects without risking a controversy. I'm not sure if its fear or social conditioning, or some combination of both, but I think it's time to try a little political tightrope-walking, because controversy seems to be the only thing that gets people to think these days.


Menolly... I could not agree more. I guess the trick is to find a way to be tactfully "untactful". It has been proven time and time again that tact these days just doesn't play well, though the rules of good taste always apply.

Political "correctness" has run amuck. Another glaring example of extremism and a good basis for fear and or negative social conditioning. As for controversy; there seems to be little of importance these days that is not controversial; but nothing changes without discussion and action.

So for me, I'm inclined to walk that political tight rope a bit ... probably just enough to find myself jumping from the pan to the fire :o

Thanks for your comments... be well!


uce
User avatar
BAReam
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Iowa--USA

Good Taste?

Postby pehiatt » Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:23 pm

The rules of good taste never apply. There is no such thing. Good taste is only an other way of stating convention. Civility has nothing to do with taste. If good taste were the rule we never would have Picasso and other giants of the modern art world.


Pawns only have real value if they live long enough to get into the power zone.

I like the tactfully untactful thing. Thats where art comes in. Artistic merit trumps everything.
Last edited by pehiatt on Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
pehiatt
 
Posts: 395
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2007 8:22 pm
Location: Frederick Maryland
Gallery: View Gallery

Re: Excentric

Postby BAReam » Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:29 pm

Erika Takacs wrote:
pehiatt wrote:There are no well known outspoken artist in the market right now. Everyone I know is holding back. We talk in private but are not ready to go public. The price is to high. Fighting government is one thing but going against the mob is another.


How about Banksy? No wonder he prefers to stay anonymous. True, it drives up the price tag, if you're that mysterious, but I don't think that's the main reason behind his hiding.

Here's a blog entry about Banksy I wrote a while ago. His website is worth to be checket out.

http://erikatakacs.wordpress.com/2008/0 ... artists-2/


Hi Ericka... I'm not familiar with Banksy, but will check it out. The truth is the truth; regardless where you find it.

Who's hiding :shock: As for me, I'm
oke; family is mostly passed, and I've got a bad attitude {not really}; so what the %$#^ they going to do to me... send me to my room.

Thanks for the feedback Erika.. love ya kid! Be well.

Bruce
User avatar
BAReam
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Iowa--USA

Love you all

Postby pehiatt » Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:39 pm

Banksy is really quite tame, social economics and anti consumerism all very main stream. I love his aborigines attacking shopping carts.

His stop and search series is a little more political but still in line with much of todays thinking. Banksy is really a visual reflection of protest that have already made their point. His popularity is an indicator that he is not really rocking the boat and most of his stuff would comfortably fit into most media venues.
User avatar
pehiatt
 
Posts: 395
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2007 8:22 pm
Location: Frederick Maryland
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby BAReam » Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:54 pm

Menolly wrote:I think pehiatt hit the nail on the head, in terms of the current attitude toward political and social issues. However, this forum strikes me as a fairly open-minded place, where it should be safe to display our true thoughts and feelings. (I will leave it to the more experienced members of this site to correct me if I am mistaken here.) I think the very fact that such fear exists in this country today should be the subject of a great deal of commentary in itself. Granted, I would never suggest that someone risk their work, their friendships, or dare I say their safety, but when even the young and foolish (I am referring to no one in particular here, except perhaps myself) are afraid to speak their minds about anything that could upset the status quo, then I would say that this country is very nearly screaming for a little reckless courage. I would think that the art world should hold at least one such person, and yet none have surfaced.

Forgive my rant. When I lack a picture for my thoughts, I tend to use the thousand words instead.


Menolly.... I don't advocate overtly offending anyone to the point of jeopardizing friendships, livelihoods or personal safety{what ever personal safety you think you have}. I do advocate challenging corporate greed and avarice; political corruption etc., etc. .. the list goes on. Let's start with the CDC's creating the HIV-AIDs virus.

Rant forgiven.. mine too? Be well.
Bruce
User avatar
BAReam
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Iowa--USA

Postby Menolly » Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:02 pm

It's all good. I look forward to seeing your work finished.
Menolly
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 3:32 pm
Gallery: View Gallery

Re: Good Taste?

Postby BAReam » Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:07 pm

pehiatt wrote:The rules of good taste never apply. There is no such thing. Good taste is only an other way of stating convention. Civility has nothing to do with taste. If good taste were the rule we never would have Picasso and other giants of the modern art world.


Pawns only have real value if they live long enough to get into the power zone.

I like the tactfully untactful thing. Thats where art comes in. Artistic merit trumps everything.


Pehiatt... I stand corrected... civility is more what I was thinking, or at least not blatantly combative. You are also correct about good taste... if everything were "tasteful" it would not have an edge or impact.

As for the Pawn... at least a hundred variations on a theme; theme being check, and mate. It's called pawn march--castle side. :D

Thanks again Pehiatt...be well.
Bruce
User avatar
BAReam
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Iowa--USA

Postby Erika Takacs » Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:08 pm

The hole Banksy painted on the barrier wall in Jerusalem was quite something in my opinion. He painted it on the Palestinian side. He didn't paint anything on the other side yet.
Erika Takacs
 
Posts: 2998
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 4:23 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada

Re: Excentric

Postby BAReam » Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:18 pm

pehiatt wrote:The art world has had many eccentrics (outside the main stream). Picasso was a communist and Dali was a fascist. Mapplethorpe was... you get the point.

Most galleries are main stream. I know some that are not but they are not doing very well. News papers, television and most other media are guarding their bottom lines. Museums are locking controversial work away in the dark corners of their vaults. Art Books are being reprinted to remove "questionable" matter. Writers are not getting published. All of this is being done to appease an intolerant and often ignorant public ready to jump on anyone not following the social-political correct line.

There are no well known outspoken artist in the market right now. Everyone I know is holding back. We talk in private but are not ready to go public. The price is to high. Fighting government is one thing but going against the mob is another.


Thanks Pehiatt... I'm going to digest all this a bit and get back a bit later. Love your input!!
Bruce
User avatar
BAReam
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Iowa--USA

Re: Love you all

Postby BAReam » Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:22 pm

pehiatt wrote:Banksy is really quite tame, social economics and anti consumerism all very main stream. I love his aborigines attacking shopping carts.

His stop and search series is a little more political but still in line with much of todays thinking. Banksy is really a visual reflection of protest that have already made their point. His popularity is an indicator that he is not really rocking the boat and most of his stuff would comfortably fit into most media venues.


I've got to check this Banksy character out... will get back!
Bruce
User avatar
BAReam
 
Posts: 664
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:05 pm
Location: Iowa--USA

Next

Return to Art Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests