A Singular Creation Art Community
promoting and showcasing all types of art and photography

Stone painting " The Golden Years"

If you want real feedback on your work and don't mind people telling you their opinions, this is the spot for you.

Moderator: Moderators

Stone painting " The Golden Years"

Postby bergina » Thu Feb 14, 2008 7:17 pm

This is an acrylic on stone painting depicting my old Golden Retriever named "Ketie". Though done many years ago I still remember it so clearly. Through the entire painting process, she would often plunk down flat on my feet. She loved my art studio. As a result, most of my earlier paintings have Golden Retriver hairs lightly sprinkled through them. I knew the end was near and was driven to portray her in a soft yet realistic way . She was the most gentle animal that I ever was so fortunate to own. This stone sits on a hardwood base and has a permanent place on a small table next to the wood stove in our living room. It is one of my favorite works, much more for the memory than the painting.
Al
Attachments
Keltie-1 (2).JPG
Keltie-1 (2).JPG (153.25 KiB)
bergina
 
Posts: 503
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2008 4:39 pm
Location: Halifax NS
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby johnwalkeasy » Sat Feb 16, 2008 8:51 pm

This work looks like a photo. Very good color and detail. It must had taken a lot of pains taking work to paint all the fur colors and details.
Perfection is what drives an artist.
The inability to achieve perfection is what creates a work of art.
John A. Barandon
http://steelbronze.vpweb.com
User avatar
johnwalkeasy
 
Posts: 2648
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 7:16 pm
Location: Rex, Georgia USA
Blog: View Blog (1)

Stone painting

Postby Carmelo » Sat Feb 16, 2008 10:15 pm

I have to admit, I've seen some I like and a lot I don't, this one is as good as any, better than most.
Carmelo
 
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 12:21 pm
Gallery: View Gallery
Blog: View Blog (2)

Postby xxbreezy » Sun Feb 17, 2008 9:31 am

Knew this one was yours!!! Love it!!! Had that Bergina touch!!
xxbreezy
 
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 10:12 am
Location: Dunn, NC
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby Blayne » Mon Feb 18, 2008 8:18 am

This is a very beautiful tribute and looks so real. How do you get such realistic effects with acrylic paint? It dries so fast, especially when using a tiny amount on a small
ush, that I end up with streaks and blobs. Any help appreciated!
Blayne
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 1:38 pm

Postby SPARTAN » Mon Feb 18, 2008 1:51 pm

IT'S A BEAUTIFUL PIECE OF WORK. NOW I SEE WHAT YOU MEANT BY STONE PAINTING.
User avatar
SPARTAN
 
Posts: 212
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 2:26 pm
Location: LIVERPOOL- UNITED KINGDOM
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby bergina » Tue Feb 19, 2008 7:20 pm

Thanks Spartan xx
eezy Camelo and JohnW for taking the time to check out my work and also your positive comments. I dug this one out from the achieves.
Blayne, you asked about creating realism with acrylics; I have been struggling with this for years. You are right about acrylic paint drying fast especially if you are working outside in the heat or sun. You end up having to duplicate a color many times from scratch. This is actually a good thing as you can't help but become better and faster at reaching a certain tone or intensity of whatever color. This is only from my prospective so experiment and see what works for you. For a painting to be realistic and if that is your direction, you must first be absolutely accurate in your layout. I know for a fact some of the best artists use a photo and projection type apparatus to outline the layout. Some artists are great drawers with a natural ability; others just worked darn hard to acquire this skill. As previously mentioned, some just trace. In any case either way, just get it done. From my experience from doing many high end dog commissions, no one really cares as long as the finished painting is beautiful and looks exactly like their dog. However they will care if something is out of proportion or just not right (I have heard this one). Once the topic is drafted, then paint it in the same format. However, not quite so simple as there is no short cut here.
Color wise, get your dark and light areas in and work them meaning progressively include more pigment / light until they are relatively accurate but loose. If you are working from one specific photo (consider yourself lucky as it rarely happens for me) blow it up so you can see better the relationship between the subtle and contrasting colors and the shapes that you have to work with.However remember, these colors are only a reference. Turn the work and your resources up side down so you will only be dealing with color and shapes. You can get hung up on the topic and this will inhibit your progress, and not good as it distracts from the painting challenges. Isolate some very specific reference point such as the distance between the two eyes (center) or the relationship between the nearest points on the nose to anywhere you want. Do some math in relation to how large your painting is. I use a very accurate protractor to cross reference my layout as color can fool you into thinking things are great when they are not. This all helps as you continue to build up your color from the darker to light, less intense to more. For this particular work I actually clipped out small chunks of hair and used them as a real up close reference. Keltie, the dog in the painting was always in my art room however, lighting is always an issue and something to consider. You have probably heard this before but it is so true. If your goal is to have a realistic painting, you can not rush the process. Take your time and lots of it. If you don’t like, do it again. I have spent an insane amount of time on some paintings just because they didn’t look right, but I wasn’t sure why? You have to paint the porcupine before you paint the quills. In other words get the dog, tree, field, boat whatever closes in color, intensity strength and detail. Them
ing out the small bushes and have some real fun and perhaps almost frighten yourself as to what you can produce.
Hope this was of some help, got to go and walk my dog,
Al
bergina
 
Posts: 503
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2008 4:39 pm
Location: Halifax NS
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby xxbreezy » Wed Feb 20, 2008 7:12 am

Bergina I always take your tips to heart. I have already applied some that you have gave me when I haven't realized what was wrong. I have picked up some tips here too that I didn't think about. Listen to him.......you can only become better at what you all are already good at.
xxbreezy
 
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 10:12 am
Location: Dunn, NC
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby Blayne » Wed Feb 20, 2008 10:50 am

Bergina, thank you for your kind and detailed reply. I reread it a couple of times. I think the major thing I am doing wrong is trying to get detail as I go, rather than laying in the major blocks of color and working up, as you recommend. I am going to apply that to a painting I'm currently struggling with. Thanks again.
Blayne
Blayne
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 1:38 pm

Postby Teknowizard » Wed Feb 20, 2008 11:28 am

I have to agree with the others, that is Very beautiful work and excellent detail.
My Facebook Fan Page - Come join as a fan and/or set up your own fan page.
User avatar
Teknowizard
 
Posts: 447
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:54 pm
Location: Merced, California
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby bergina » Wed Feb 20, 2008 3:51 pm

Thanks again for the nice compliments.
Al
bergina
 
Posts: 503
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2008 4:39 pm
Location: Halifax NS
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby Ted » Wed Feb 20, 2008 4:19 pm

Most Excellent! very good detail.
User avatar
Ted
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:23 pm
Location: Atlanta
Gallery: View Gallery


  • Similar topics
    Replies
    Views
    Author

Return to I Am Ready For The Fury

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests