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Tyrannosaurus Rex

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Postby Menolly » Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:21 am

This is so cool! :D I'm getting into welding myself, but VERY basic stuff, so this is going to be fun to watch. I love that you're using something as basic as nails... it reminds me of the people who build sculptures out of Legos, or portraits out of mosaic tiles.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sat Apr 03, 2010 6:44 pm

Menolly. I,m glad to see you have an interest in doing metal sculpture. And ofcourse welding is the key skill one needs to do this kind of work. And I will help you any way I can. This is really what this tread is all about. To help people like yourseft. Am not able to do much this weekend. Still doing some work on my house. But that will all be finished up by monday. And nexk week I,ll be back to Rex. Be sure to wear a paper mask when you weld and grind. And I,m sure you know to wear safety glasses.
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WOW...

Postby jenn_iam » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:23 pm

John...
This is fabulous!!!

What is your expected Scale???
May your world be painted in the Brightest of colors!

Jennifer Erin
-Artist/Illustrator / Film/Media Designer & SFX MakeUp / Storyboard Artist
(All mediums; Conceptual Design, Costume Creation, to Application)
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Postby Menolly » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:33 pm

Yup, safety glasses or the welder's helmet at all times. Kind of hard to do sculpture if you're blind! :D

By the way, got any tips on fixing wire to a solid piece of metal - besides drilling a hole and tying it into a knot? I want to incorporate aluminum or copper wire into my next piece, and I'm thinking the spot welder is going to be too aggressive.
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Postby Geoff_Anthony » Mon Apr 05, 2010 10:18 pm

Having welding qualifications myself, only ever use a welding helmet when electric welding, wear sunscreen on any uncovered parts of your body as weld burn is worse than sunburn.
Always read the safety data sheet on the pack of welding electrodes as some types are carcinogenic, so you may need a respirator.
Using an oxy torch for welding is safer, but you now are working with a naked flame. Keep any/all flammables well away from the work area.

If you are a beginner, always have some scraps of metal about to practice on, and there are some very good books on the subject online. Just google, 'basic welding for beginners' and you will be amazed at the amount of info you get.
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Postby Menolly » Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:09 am

Thanks for the tips! Yeah, I've only done electric welding so far, and always have a denim jacket on under the apron to catch anything that gets around the sleeves or the gloves. Hoping to get into using the oxy torch on a later project. :D
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Fri Apr 09, 2010 7:28 pm

Jennifer, The work shold be about 30 to 40 inchs long. And about 16 to 20 inchs tall at the head. And about 14 to 15 inchs high at the hip. And when one is building a piece that is smaller than what it would be in real life. Things like the head, Hands, feet should be larger in proprotion to the rest of the work. This gives the work a more robust look.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:12 pm

Menolly, Drilling should be the best way to bind any type of wire to steel. Thier are two ways I can think of now to do it. We might come up with a better idea later. Sometimes just the doing of somthing tells us better ways to go about it. To begin with. When you are drilling or sawing steel. The best kind of steel to use is what is called Cold Rolled steel, Or called Machine steel. You can get this kind of steel at machine tool shops. They will be happy to give you some scraps. If you are bending steel. The best for that is Hot Rolled steel. Or sometimes called Dead Soft Steel. You can get this kind of steel at a Metal Fab. Shop. Cold rolled steel is clear and
ight when new. And has fine square edges, Hot roll steel has a dark kind of crust on it. And has a less atractive look about it. As far as the welding of these steels go. Thier is no differntance. Think of cold roll steel as a bed box spring. And hot roll as a matress. One way to go about your task with the wire. Is to drill the holes useing the cold roll steel. You can ofcoure use hot roll if that,s all you can get. But it will be more difficuft to drill. Drill the holes the same size as the wire. Or maybe a bit smaller. Cut your wires at the lenght you want them to be. Place them in your freezer overnight. Get some 3&1 oil. place a little drop into your holes. Take your wires out of the freezer. They should slide in kinda easy. When they warm back to room temperture they will tighten up inside the holes. Another way to go about this. Is to use a product called lock tight. You can get this at Auto Zone. It comes in a small plastic bottle. Use no oil if you do it this way. But let your wire freeze overnight. This makes the metal contract. When it wrams up it gets back to it,s starting size. Another way that,s comes to mind. Depending on what you are trying to do. Is drill you holes all the way though the steel. Let a little stick out on the other side. And flaten it with a hammer. Kinda making a rivet. Maybe a combination of these things will work well. And ofcourse as you work. Better and differnt ways will come to you.
Last edited by johnwalkeasy on Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:16 pm

Anthony, That is some very good advice. Safty is always the most important issue.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:18 pm

Menolly, By the way. What kind of welding are you doing? Mig, Tig, stick?
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Postby Geoff_Anthony » Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:47 pm

As he seems a beginner; I would guess stick (electric Arc) as mig and tig both require more than basic knowledge.
Oh, to avoid those darker moments, be sure to unplug a few things in the house before arcing up. If the electrode catches/sticks, it can short out fuses or trip out earth leak switches. With this in mind & safety, also have a torch handy and in easy reach while doing this just to be sure.
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Postby Menolly » Sat Apr 10, 2010 12:33 pm

Well, I don't have to worry about shorting fuses or that, since all my welding is in the sculpture studio at school. But I have been using the mig welder, supervised by my professor.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sat Apr 10, 2010 5:52 pm

Menolly, The next time you are in your sculpture glass. Look and see what kind of gas is being use.( Ofcourse it could be the intersheild Kind. I hope not) Also see what size welding wire is in the machine. By the way. The welding lens you are useing. In resent years a lens was invented that starts out as see though. And truns dark when you strike an ark and start welding. I would advise against useing such a lens. If that,s what your school has given you to use. You,ll know what I,m talking about. Over time, Useing a lens like that will damage your eyes. A standered # 10 or #ll is the thing to use. Just telling you that so you,ll know. I wish you good luck with your sculpture studio.
Perfection is what drives an artist.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:17 pm

Toe nails are welded together. Next step is to graind the weld off.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:20 pm

Next step is to clean them with some smaller grinding tools and wire
ush.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:21 pm

photo
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Perfection is what drives an artist.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:24 pm

Toe nails are done. There are 3 nails on the front of the foot. And 1 on the back. 8 in all.
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Perfection is what drives an artist.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:24 pm

photo
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Perfection is what drives an artist.
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:30 pm

Now, these toe nails are over sized. This is done so that the work will have a more griping look. However, I don,t want him to look like big bird. So this is guess work. If I don,t guess right. It.s line up and punt.
Perfection is what drives an artist.
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Postby BYart » Sun Apr 11, 2010 3:45 pm

:D John! What a treat this is...watching you work!
I am so impressed with your abilities in metal work!
Am pulling up a chair and can't wait for another update! Very COOL!
Barb

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