A Singular Creation Art Community
promoting and showcasing all types of art and photography

Difficulties in drawing...

If you want to discuss anything art related this is the place to be.

Moderator: Moderators

Difficulties in drawing...

Postby jenn_iam » Wed Jun 14, 2006 11:24 am

I was told long ago, that the human body was the most difficult to draw... In some ways I agree, but in others - well... they all present their own set of challenges..

Are there any areas that present obstacles currently to anyone, that perhaps a tip or trick may be helpful to overcome it... or

Perhaps, are there any lessons learned that need to be shared??
May your world be painted in the Brightest of colors!

Jennifer Erin
-Artist/Illustrator / Film/Media Designer & SFX MakeUp / Storyboard Artist
(All mediums; Conceptual Design, Costume Creation, to Application)
User avatar
jenn_iam
Moderator
 
Posts: 1312
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 12:16 pm
Location: Sacramento, CA
Gallery: View Gallery
Blog: View Blog (2)

Postby drawn2art » Thu Jun 15, 2006 9:56 am

The only tip I can offer is that you DO NOT throw out your so called crappy drawings! More times than not there is probably something(s) you did right in that drawing and instead of crumpling it up and tossing it in the trash...keep it and make a few notes about what you like and don't like about the work....this makes for a great learning tool for future drawings too! :D 8) :)
User avatar
drawn2art
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 12:20 pm
Location: Alberta, Canada

Postby Singular » Thu Jun 15, 2006 10:17 am

I always thought that drawing was much more difficult than painting because there is so much less room for error. I also have noticed that some people just have a natural ability to draw well and some, no matter how much they try, never get to that higher lever of skill. Here's what I believe to be the reason. The great ones understand. They know what it is they are drawing and can visualize what the finished product will look like. The others can get there if they learn to do this. It may not come natural for some, so it will take a lot more work for them.

So in relating this to our topic, I recommend that any sort of drawing you are looking to get into, study your subject matter. If you want to draw figures, get an anatomy book from the li
ary and learn the human body. Learn how each muscle forms a specific shape and what it looks like in different lights. It is next to impossible to draw the human body unless you understand it. You will be amazed at how much better your figure drawing will be once you truly see what you are drawing.

best regards,
Joe
User avatar
Singular
Founder
 
Posts: 4344
Articles: 28
Joined: Wed Apr 26, 2006 12:08 pm
Location: Maryland
Gallery: View Gallery
Blog: View Blog (2)

Postby SONIC » Sat Jun 17, 2006 1:52 pm

Hmmmmm. Well since I have taught drawing to a few folks including myself I would suggest that you leave your left
ain (that logical thing)
in a closet or at the very least in a drawer someplace.

It is a pesky reminder of everything that you 'KNOW'
which just creates a conundrum as you tend to hold these
images in front of your eyes and
negate what you actually see!

Simply put, what you see is reality. Not what you percieve but what is actually there.

If it looks bizzare well no one ever said everything was pretty.
Things really are skewed depending on your vp.

Another thing is choose your perspective well.

If you are right on top of something well everything is
foreshortened and looks messed up but your eyes don't lie.

The
ain well it accepts memories as reality.

It has been discerned that the
ain doesn't differentiate
between actual tangible imagery and memory imagery.

So, let's say as a kid you drew that universal see through cube.

Well, depending on where you are in space that cube could be ridiculously distorted. Um, Right?!

Check out 'What the Bleep do we know?!'
and you'll see what I'm on about.

Also. measurement yep that pencil in your hand
will keep your stuff in scale and show you how extreme
some angles truly are.

I guess that is really it.

Pick up if so inclined 'Drawing from the Right Side of the Brain.'

I personally feel it is an invaluable tool to learn this whole drawing thing.

Even if you are a surrealist, you still have to know the basics.

Well, perhaps you might want to.

Happy Visuals!

TO KNOW ME IS TO KNOW THYSELF.
JOY IS WITHIN AND WHEN IT IS SO
IT WILL BE NOT ONLY MANIFESTED
WITHOUT BUT FELT THERE AS WELL.
PEACE~ BILL 5ONIC GUIDE
MODERNMYSTERYSCHOOL.COM
SONIC
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri May 26, 2006 3:06 pm
Location: GAIA

Postby wise_monkey » Sat Jun 17, 2006 4:09 pm

I love life drawing and some of the basics that i tend to go with ....and trust me i am only know getting it 1 year later....is start of with looking at the shapes, what is the person really constructed with, 2nd if you are unsure of some shapes and such or how the body flows look at the negative space around your figure aswell, that tends to put this in a totally different perspective for you. 2nd relax and have fun with it, oh and go with the line of action, if you can nail that from the start you have a pretty good chance of nailing the rest. also map out everything and line up stuff.....make sure the elbow is in relation to the knee, see at what angle teh shoulders are...so yeah good luck! i do agree tho to study anatomy, it really helps once you get to know the muscles and bones
wise_monkey
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 9:22 am
Location: Toronto

Postby saphyre » Wed Jun 21, 2006 7:14 pm

I had a difficult time drawing a lot of things when I first started. But then one day in an art class the instructor laid out a spectrum of different colors for paper. Almost all of the class chose white or near to it but I was imediatly drawn to the black paper. I found that changing the way I look at things I draw make it easier to do so. Like when I drew on white paper I focused on the dark places of the subject but when I draw on the black paper I focus on the light parts. The shadows become secondary and can be darkend if need be. Sometimes you just need to find the right mix of mediums to be able to get over the short commings you see in your work.

For drawing the human figure I found that the nose and mouth are always difficult for me. The only thing I try to do is practice drawing myself. That way you don't feel obligated to show someone what you drew of them and drawing from a real subject is always better than a photo. (Someone skilled will in most cases be able to tell the difference.) Good luck & Happy Rendering!
User avatar
saphyre
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2006 5:53 pm
Location: Providence, RI
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby Singular » Thu Jun 22, 2006 10:17 am

saphyre wrote:I had a difficult time drawing a lot of things when I first started. But then one day in an art class the instructor laid out a spectrum of different colors for paper. Almost all of the class chose white or near to it but I was imediatly drawn to the black paper. I found that changing the way I look at things I draw make it easier to do so. Like when I drew on white paper I focused on the dark places of the subject but when I draw on the black paper I focus on the light parts. The shadows become secondary and can be darkend if need be. Sometimes you just need to find the right mix of mediums to be able to get over the short commings you see in your work.

For drawing the human figure I found that the nose and mouth are always difficult for me. The only thing I try to do is practice drawing myself. That way you don't feel obligated to show someone what you drew of them and drawing from a real subject is always better than a photo. (Someone skilled will in most cases be able to tell the difference.) Good luck & Happy Rendering!


Drawing faces and figures can be very difficult, especially for a beginner. When I first started, I was frustrated at why my drawings did not look realistic. My main problem is that I drew lines. Then I realized that the face doesn't have lines: it has shapes. My drawings always seemed to be harsh with difintive outlines. The more I actually studied the face and the contours and musculature, the more I was able to draw shades instead of lines, making my drawings more real.
User avatar
Singular
Founder
 
Posts: 4344
Articles: 28
Joined: Wed Apr 26, 2006 12:08 pm
Location: Maryland
Gallery: View Gallery
Blog: View Blog (2)

Postby saphyre » Thu Jun 22, 2006 5:49 pm

Singular wrote:
Drawing faces and figures can be very difficult, especially for a beginner. When I first started, I was frustrated at why my drawings did not look realistic. My main problem is that I drew lines. Then I realized that the face doesn't have lines: it has shapes. My drawings always seemed to be harsh with difintive outlines. The more I actually studied the face and the contours and musculature, the more I was able to draw shades instead of lines, making my drawings more real.


Agreed. It is easier to look at something and see the light and dark instead of where something ends and begins. ABut ever since I startedo n the black paper it has been more difficult to go back to white. Seeing the light shades and shapes seem easier and my pictures have come out more dramatic. :wink: And sometimes people don't believe it when I tell them it was on black paper. ^.^
In this world hate never yet dispelled hate. Only love dispels hate. This is the law, ancient and inexhaustable. ~the Dhammapada
User avatar
saphyre
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2006 5:53 pm
Location: Providence, RI
Gallery: View Gallery

Postby Singular » Thu Jun 22, 2006 5:53 pm

saphyre wrote:
Agreed. It is easier to look at something and see the light and dark instead of where something ends and begins. ABut ever since I startedo n the black paper it has been more difficult to go back to white. Seeing the light shades and shapes seem easier and my pictures have come out more dramatic. :wink: And sometimes people don't believe it when I tell them it was on black paper. ^.^


I would love to see one of your pictures on black paper. You should post one in the "Just Showing" forum if you get a chance.

best regards,
Joe
User avatar
Singular
Founder
 
Posts: 4344
Articles: 28
Joined: Wed Apr 26, 2006 12:08 pm
Location: Maryland
Gallery: View Gallery
Blog: View Blog (2)

Postby stardove » Sat Jul 15, 2006 11:38 pm

8) Hi I am new here and I have found that as you are drawing the face you just start drawing and don't go by the wa some people tell you and that is quarter your face.
I am a new I have been drawing since I was 5 but I stopped because my dad said I was no good. Juanita
stardove
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2006 11:26 pm
Location: Oregon

Re: Difficulties in drawing...

Postby artauction » Fri Oct 19, 2012 2:19 am

In order to draw the human figure well, you need to have a good knowledge of human anatomy. If the pose or the drawing doesn't work out, then you haven't put loads of effort into the drawing and you can try again without regrets.
artauction
 
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 6:10 am

Re: Difficulties in drawing...

Postby johnlobbs » Fri Dec 21, 2012 8:24 am

Here are some suggestions which can help you to ease up your drawing:

1.Have a plan
2.Work on your drawing on a different paper then transfer your drawing
3.Pay attention to your edges quality
4.Use your colors all over the painting
5.Have fun
johnlobbs
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2012 7:44 am

Re: Difficulties in drawing...

Postby ehoeveler » Fri Dec 21, 2012 2:29 pm

All good suggestions and John, you hit the nail
on the head! E.
User avatar
ehoeveler
 
Posts: 5718
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2007 7:06 pm
Location: Stockbridge, Ga.
Gallery: View Gallery


  • Similar topics
    Replies
    Views
    Author

Return to Art Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests