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What is your painting worth?

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What is your painting worth?

Postby SER » Thu Oct 04, 2007 6:55 pm

Since I am new, I don't know if this was discussed. I want to know how people decide what to sell there work for. This is probably the single most difficult thing I deal with. Does how much time you spend on it come into play? I am a semi perfectionist and can spend forever fixing things. I know artists that can do a piece in an hour and get a lot of money. Is size a factor? How do you judge your worth? SER
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Postby johnwalkeasy » Thu Oct 04, 2007 9:37 pm

Ser, That,s hard to know. However, you have a high level of skill. And your work has that real look about it. But the art market is as strange as mars. It seems most anything will sell in galleries. Which makes it kinda hard on people like youself. I always say price work high. see how it does. And ajust from there. And I think size does matter. I would say for work that might be placed in the home. Around 2foot x 3foot would be good. And for corperate work. Around 6foot x 4foot would be good.
Perfection is what drives an artist.
The inability to achieve perfection is what creates a work of art.
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Postby DLKeur » Thu Oct 04, 2007 11:39 pm

Originals or prints? Originals: You are NEVER going to see that painting again. You are never going to get another dime for it after you sell it, you are never going to be able to wonder at it and the fact it came out of your hand, mind and heart. Price it accordingly, then triple that price. And if the world astounds you, do NOT sell it except for a sum that you just can't pass up...but get good professsional digital scans of it before it goes and sell prints.

Prints 300% markup, minimum over production costs.
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Postby glomski777 » Mon May 12, 2008 1:13 pm

DLKeur wrote:but get good professsional digital scans of it before it goes and sell prints.

Prints 300% markup, minimum over production costs.


ok, so where can you get this done? I don't think I'm anywhere near ready to sell, but just for future reference if it ever comes :)
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Postby bergina » Mon Jun 16, 2008 9:24 pm

SER,
Intersting question;
I side with DLKeur in some aspects. Take a digital shot of your work outdoors in mid tone light ( no sun) , copy it on disc and then focus on selling your original and hopefully make some art revenue as you will hopefully make many more as good or most likely,better. The good thing is that you will establish a “selling pattern” for your work . You want to be recognized as an artist who’s work is in demand. Sell all your work that you can part with but never give it away ( unless you follow my earlier path, not advised) . I have personally kept about 30 pieces, never for sale. Do you have an on line venue where people can see your work? If so, indicate “sold” when you sell something. I checked out your work on singular and understand your comment with reference to being somewhat of a perfectionalist and the time factor involved in finishing a piece of work. However, this is why your work is so darn good! Creating good paintings with realistic style is not for those who watch the clock. I personally just worry about what month it is ( don't want to miss any important dates such as Christmas, birthdays , anniversary’s etc. just kidding ) Anyone who pushes realism / detail doesn’t knock it of in a weekend. I don’t care what they say. But what is the work worth? That is a tough question. I guess it’s worth what someone wants to pay for it which doesn’t help much. You have to find the right person or persons who really appreciate the quality of your work and they are definitely out there for you. I can only refer to my own personal experience.
I can say that aside from my immediate and extended family, after some hard lessons, I now rarely part with a piece of art work, original or print, without feeling reasonably compensated but this did not come overnight. I initially gave away many of my earlier artworks to mostly friends who offered me , well an insulting fee. Not their fault, as they just had no idea the time I spent and the real value of the work. I didn’t know the real value either except I knew I produce what I thought was a great piece of art, spent all my spare time for weeks and they offered me $ 200.00
My response was “ Just take it”, no charge. I never took any money . It was much easier for me mentally to give it away than to establish myself as a $ 200.00 artist. I didn’t know what my art was worth but I knew I wasn’t that so – just take it , no charge ( knowing what I know, I would never do this now) .
Eventually during my Stone, Dog painting days I did a few art shows and this is where I found my specific market. People love their dogs. I told any potential customers, flat out $ 1000.00 to start. This was not easy but I had to be true to myself. I had done some what I considered really nice stone work and had it on display. I had more offers than I could handle and never did get caught up.
SO…
Size does matter as the larger the work, more time to produce, meaning higher price.
If you are represented by an established gallery, they will take between 40 and 60 % of the selling price. If they will work for you, this isn’t a bad deal, though it just seems like it. If you can. Find an established gallery who will honestly promote you.
It’s much better to start your prices low and then when you have some sales, put your prices up. Going the other way is not a good thing for you or your work.
Put a reasonable price and stick with it. You are not a flee market and
Never sell your work at a flee market!
Whatever you sell this year, bump it up by 7% -10% next year.
Most established professional artists take 30 or so years to see an honest consistent fair dollar for their time tallent and skill. I didn't answer you initial question but came as close as I could.
Hope this was of some help.
Al
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Art is like real estate

Postby pehiatt » Mon Jun 16, 2008 10:37 pm

Unfortunately when it gets down to dollars and cents art is like real estate. Size maters. Art is priced by the square foot. And location location location. People seldom rely on there own likes and dislikes. They rely instead on a good gallery to indicate a work of art is worth the interest. Like real estate agents the better the gallery and the harder they work to represent you the better the price.

Flea markets get flea prices. Over price and you will end up with a lot of pictures on your own walls. Under price and you will starve.

Better painters are like better builders and they get better prices. But art is not always technique and skill. Grab the audience with a profound and memorable image and there can be big bucks.

Price is based on.

Standing: How well known is the artist, juried shows and competitions
Consistency: Does the artist consistently create quality work.
Record: Does the artist have a solid record of sales
Size: On average today small paintings 8x10 to 16X20 sell for 500 to 2200 dollars. Larger works get proportionately more.

Time: 1 to 2 years gets a 1000 -- 30-40 years 40,000 plus, Good press and the sky is the limit.

You build your own market and its a lot of work. Know your audience. For the best gauge study comparable work in a good gallery. Watch the prices.
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Postby bergina » Tue Jun 17, 2008 12:42 am

Pehiatt,
So well explained. I agree with everything except the 1- 2 year / $ 1000.00, as I can’t figure this out? Are you referring to working at your art skills for 1- 2 years or an actual painting? I assume it’s the first however, not many people I know work this time period and then demand that kind of money.
I believe you are probably one of if not the most skilled trained and articulate artists that respond to this forum. Your work is just phenomenal. I always enjoy reading your comments and your occasionally tutorial type answers.

Al
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Could have put it better

Postby pehiatt » Tue Jun 17, 2008 10:02 am

An emerging artist who is relatively well skilled might be able to get a 1000 dollars for a small 16x20 painting. After 30-40 years of a well developed career that same size painting in a special market with a dedicated following might
ing as much as 40,000. The key is critical acclaim. Most of the top name artist have had a major successful exhibition, lets say in New York, with positive press coverage by known art critics.

A lot of it is who you know.
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Postby bergina » Wed Jun 18, 2008 1:37 am

I can definitely dig it!
Thanks,
Al
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Try an experiment

Postby pehiatt » Wed Jun 18, 2008 9:03 am

Go to the internet and find galleries and websites that have works that you like. Those that have prices are best.

Download a dozen or so of those you like best to a folder.

Paste these images into a page using Word or similar program.

Select images of two of your best pieces.

Paste them into an arrangement of the work on the same page.

Print the page.

Look at the results.

Ask the following.

Does my work stand out?
Does my work hold its own?
Would my work fit in to a gallery showing these works?
How would my expected price compare with the others?

You might be surprized!!!

Try this again based on prices you expect to get for your work.
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Postby Erika Takacs » Wed Jun 18, 2008 9:06 am

Very interesting approach to pricing, Pat. You're always so helpful!
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